Smart city news and stories
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Jose Suarez
10 hours ago
Jose Suarez
Smart City Expert

Tucked along Lake Ontario, the Canadian city of Mississauga is a bustling hub of business, performance and innovation. While Mississauga may often be overshadowed by neighboring Toronto, the city's position as an emerging leader among smart cities cannot be disputed.

Mississauga's overall vision of creating a connected community is propelled by well-thought-out partnerships and robust citywide development plans. Backed by enthusiastic investment and creative enterprises, the city and its leadership are enabling deeper connections among various city enterprises.

The municipality -- Canada's sixth largest, with a population of more than 720,000 -- has become an early leader in the use of sensors and fiber networks to create data-driven solutions to address citywide concerns. With guidance from Slack and Mayor Bonnie Crombie for implementing strategies from the city's strategic and IT master plans, these efforts are delivering efficient, productive and transparent services to citize...

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James Bell
19 hours ago
James Bell
Smart City Expert

Soon the conventional tungsten filament bulbs will become a thing of the past. And, the recently arrived high-tech lightings will become the symbol of intelligence, efficiency, safety and reliability in smart cities. The pace at which smart city intelligent lighting projects are moving forward will soon bring in a new lighting revolution in the urban world – perhaps, just as phenomenal as the invention of Thomas Edison. Whether they are street lights, traffic lights or indoor lights, their intensity of brightness will change according to our needs. Thanks to the innovation in technology, new lighting designs integrated with artificial intelligence are evolving day by day introducing far-reaching applications in homes, buildings and public places.

LABCITIES
yesterday
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The transportation industry is ripe for advancement. With the addition of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, the industry might not be recognizable in 10 or 20 years. More connectivity means fully optimized operations and manufacturing, decreased downtime and accidents, and — what everyone is waiting for — driverless vehicles and ships.

Advancements cannot come soon enough. The International Transport Forum’s 2017 Transport Outlook notes that, due to the combination of population growth, urbanization, and globalization, carbon dioxide emissions from transport are expected to increase 60 percent by 2050. There are more people and goods moving around the globe, which has increased the need for vehicles, planes, and ships, leading to more pollution. To combat this, the transportation industry must undergo changes to accommodate increased global movement. The leading solution is through IoT technologies, which can limit the impact globalization, population growth, and urbanization has on the environment.

Jürgen Schmidt
2 days ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Modern cities are brimming with objects that receive, collect and transmit data. This includes mobile phones but also objects actually embedded into our cities, such as traffic lights and air pollution stations. Even something as simple as a garbage bin can now be connected to the internet, meaning that it forms part of what is called the internet of things (IoT). A smart city collects the data from these digital objects, and uses it to create new products and services that make cities more liveable.

Although they have huge potential to make life better, the possibility of increasingly smarter cities also raises serious privacy concerns. Through sensors embedded into our cities, and the smartphones in our pockets, smart cities will have the power to constantly identify where people are, who they are meeting and even perhaps what they are doing.

Following revelations that 87m people’s Facebook data was allegedly breached and used to influence electoral voting behaviour, it is ever more important to properly scrutinise where our data goes and how it is used. Similarly, as more and more critical infrastructure falls victim to cyber-attacks, we need to consider that our cities are not only becoming smarter, they are also becoming more vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

LABCITIES
3 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Many cities - an increasing number of major African metros among them - are beginning to outgrow themselves. Ageing populations, increasing urban density, resource issues and mobility constraints - these are among the primary issues faced by urban areas. Upgrading or adding to physical infrastructure is possible, but urban adjustment is notoriously slow, and cities' budgets are increasingly tight. To cope with the demands they'll face tomorrow, cities need to find ways of making the most of what they've got today.

By optimising the flow of everything from traffic to electricity and information around a city, urban life can become far easier, with the potential for cost savings through reduced waste.

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