Last stories on 'Integration and social programs'
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LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Soon, one third of humanity will live in a slum. Our cities are at breaking point. Over 90% of urbanisation this century will be due to the growth of slums. By the end of this century, the top megacities will no longer be London and Tokyo; they will almost all be in Asia and Africa, and they will be far bigger than the metropolises of today. Lagos is projected to have a population of 88 million. Dhaka: 76 million. Kinshasa: 63 million. The world is fundamentally restructuring itself.

What if there were a new type of city that is a better fit for this century? One that is more lightweight, light touch and adaptive than we’ve seen before. What if the future of our cities could come from the rethinking of slums?

Sustainable. Walkable. Livable. These terms are often used to paint visions of our preferred urban future. Yet the formal notion of a city is quite calcified; it’s heavy and clunky and inflexible. Cities today lack the flexibility to absorb emerging radical possibilities. Wh...

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Jim Frazer
last month
Jim Frazer
Senior Executive – Intelligent Transportation Systems, Illumination and the Smart City

There’s a significant amount of ambiguity in specifying a smart city project today. This lack of clarity costs time, dollars and often can lead you far astray from your smart city vision. Since the smart city effort is truly in its early adopter phase, it’s also not surprising that this ambiguity is also dramatically promoted by the marketing hyperbole of many vendors in the domain. This scenario is increasingly being defined as Smart City 1.0.

Smart City 2.0 describes a reality where the governmental agency takes the lead in pioneering solutions. This too, as can easily be imagined, can quickly lead to large negative unintended consequences,

With these assumptions in mind, this white paper will attempt to define a sustainable, repeatable, scalable and economically sensible path forward for cities and projects of all sizes.

So what’s Smart City 3.0?

The Smart City 3.0 is a Smart City initiative is driven by public expectations – or more precisely “user needs”. While Smart City 1.0 and 2.0 are driven by technology and government decisions respectively, Smart City 3.0 is neither driven by technology nor solely by government agencies.

In Smart City 3.0, the public expresses their views, wishes and needs with the government acting as a facilitator (and as a definer of agency-specific user needs).

more at; https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/smart-city-30-manifesto-building-deploying-compelling-jim-frazer/

Pieterjan Blondeel
last month
Pieterjan Blondeel
Head of Urban Operations at Joyn Belgium nv

Nowadays everything is smart. Your car, your phone and even your tootbrush. And you are also living in a city that becomes smarter by the day. They are smart and all talk to each other thanks to The Internet of Things.

Here is the problem with that: everything is getting smart but it does not mean everyone is getting smart(er).

Not everyone has a smartphone, not everyone knows how to access the internet and some of us don’t know how to drive. That’s nothing to be ashamed off. Not at all.

But the truth is that you are missing a lot of what’s happening. You are looking at a disprutive movement and have no clue what it is about. You can’t benefit the advantages. That’s not fair.

LABCITIES
7 months ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

With the amount of data available today, cities are constantly innovating, finding new ways to apply insights in ways that benefit citizens. This is no small task, as new technologies are constantly reshaping what’s possible when it comes to using and making sense of data.

Data creates opportunities. Cities are rife with challenges that not only impact their own residents but society at large. IoT, artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are now poised to address some of the most pressing social challenges, like homelessness, transportation and public safety.

As cities find new ways to analyze data and extract insights that help solve some of their most immediate challenges, they’re also creating promising assets for tackling issues beyond their borders. Whether it’s Copenhagen’s increase in smart technologies to reduce emissions or New York’s efforts to modernize its subway and ferry systems, cities and the organizations that work with them are tackling issues that have implications on citizens around the world.

LABCITIES
7 months ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Cities overwhelmed by refugees or migrants don’t have to search for solutions alone. They have an increasingly robust ally to help them through a humanitarian crisis: technology.

Across the globe, municipalities are harnessing the power of data analytics, smartphone apps and other innovations to track sudden population shifts or connect directly with immigrants to provide essential services.

A report from the Rockefeller Foundation spotlights the variety of advanced tools now available, from financial services for the “unbanked” to easy-to-access Internet-based business-license applications.

Global Migration: Resilient Cities at the Forefront, was published by 100 Resilient Cities, an initiative launched in 2013 by the foundation that aims to help cities strengthen their resilience to physical, social and economic challenges.

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