Last stories on 'Communications and IoT'
START A NEW CONVERSTATION
LABCITIES
2 hours ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Have you ever heard about smart cities where traffic, public services and document circulation are fully automated? The smart city concept integrates big data and the internet of things (IoT) to optimize the efficiency of urban processes and services and connect to residents. One example of this innovation could be light sensors that save electricity and road surveillance costs.

The basis for how automated systems and infrastructure sensors will coordinate their activities and communicate with each other is currently being tested in Dubai, some cities in China and the US.

Sarah Wray
yesterday
Sarah Wray
Editor, SmartCitiesWorld

While almost all cities now talk about the importance of putting citizens at the centre of smart city initiatives, clear examples showing what this looks like in practice are rare.

At the CityVerve Marketplace event this week, which reported on the smart city demonstrator’s progress over two years, it was refreshing to hear about the approaches the Manchester-based project has taken to engage, inform and entertain its citizens with the technology being implemented.

LABCITIES
5 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

There's a need for smart city tech on dry land and at sea, and Las Vegas, Cary, NC, and the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands have all found ways to benefit from adding technology. Officials from the three municipalities shared their stories at Cisco Live 2018 in Orlando, FL.

Cisco uses its Kinetics platform to work with each of these customers to analyze data traffic from sensors, cell phone, video feeds and other sources in order to create policy, such as a security configuration policy, and to give city leaders information that can improve the lives of citizens and visitors.

In the Port of Rotterdam, officials have launched the 42 container that will replace traditional shipping containers. The smart container will launch Rotterdam into the digital world of shipping, which ties into the smart city tech already in place in the city of Rotterdam.

LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

With some things you can get away with the one size fits all mentality, but not when it comes to smart cities. Geographic, cultural, financial, and technical considerations that vary from city to city dictate how technologies can be applied to the smart city concept. Ultimately, however, the end goal is always the same: to use connectivity, the cloud, and data analytics – in other words, the Internet of Things (IoT) – to enhance the lives of a city’s residents.

This can translate to anything from reducing traffic congestion and pollution to optimising supply of energy and water, from improving waste management to making urban infrastructure maintenance more efficient.

In all of these areas, the IoT plays a central role. It enables data collection from an almost infinite variety of sensors and other sources, the processing of that data locally or in the cloud, and the initiation of actions based on information gleaned from it. From smart meters to smart parking spaces, every face...

show more
LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The day when cars can talk to each other – and to traffic lights, stop signs, guardrails and even pavement markings – is rapidly approaching. Driven by the promise of reducing traffic congestion and avoiding crashes, these systems are already rolling out on roads around the U.S.

For instance, the Intelligent Traffic Signal System, developed with support from the U.S. Department of Transportation, has been tested on public roads in Arizona and California and is being installed more widely in New York City and Tampa, Florida. It allows vehicles to share their real-time location and speed with traffic lights, which can be used to effectively optimize the traffic timing in coordination with the real-time traffic demand to dramatically reduce vehicle waiting time in an intersection.

Our work, from the RobustNet Research Group and the Michigan Traffic Laboratory at the University of Michigan, focuses on making sure these next-generation transportation systems are secure and protected from attacks. So far we’ve found they are in fact relatively easy to trick. Just one car that’s transmitting fake data can cause enormous traffic jams, and several attack cars could work together to shut down whole areas. What’s particularly concerning is that our research has found the weakness is not in the underlying communication technology, but in the algorithms actually used to manage the traffic flow.

Sponsored
LABCITIES.TV