Last stories on 'Open data and privacy'
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Jason Black
5 days ago
Jason Black
Project Manager

The delivery of city services is being transformed by smart technologies that are providing city managers with new insights into operational performance and providing platforms for new forms of personalized and responsive services. Central to this transformation is the availability of real-time data from a growing range of intelligent devices that can monitor city operations. Sensors, communications networks, and the real-time data cities collect can enable more intelligent, efficient, sustainable, and interactive public services. The new technologies are helping cities make the most of limited budgets while adding additional value to the services provided to their communities. These innovations have the potential to drive a revolutionary change in the way city services are delivered in term of the quality, efficiency, and responsiveness of services.

LABCITIES
6 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

or years, cities have been trying to use data that has sat, siloed in individual departments. Even as that historic data is liberated and made more open, however, more and different types of data are coming in. Since the advent of smartphones with built in GPS, location data, streaming from millions of phones, has created new opportunities – and headaches – for cities.

Out of this new data, location intelligence (LI) has emerged, a field that uses geospatial information to tackle problems. Governments are using location intelligence to see where residents are, and to improve and hone projects, especially within public safety and transportation.

Using location information, cities can effectively create digital nervous systems of how their cities run. Cities can use maps overlaid with data points, sourced from connected personal devices, to analyze problems and find data-driven solutions.

Massive amounts of data coming in, from smart trash cans, to smart traffic lights, to GPS data from mobile devices, are an as-of-yet untapped resource for cities to find solutions to problems that can’t be solved with traditional city management tools.

Julian Sandler
last week
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

Hurricane Harvey has dumped trillions of gallons of rainwater on Houston, causing catastrophic flooding that's reaping destruction and death throughout the city. Recovery efforts are likely to continue for months, if not years, and now as they commence, experts are stressing that open data and tech are instrumental in the long process to come.

The most direct impact of big data is likely to be on damage assessment, a foundational step in distributing the insurance payouts and federal aid people need to get back into their houses, as well as in soliciting donations from the private sector and volunteers. By using geographic information system (GIS) mapping technology, responders can create a quick, thorough and easy-to-access dataset, one that shows stakeholders — from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to potential donors — who needs help, where they are, and exactly how much damage has occurred.

Julian Sandler
2 weeks ago
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

Open data is changing the world, but it's not just about open data anymore. Data sharing with various permission levels allow for greater problem-solving.

Cities and communities are increasingly using data and technology to enhance public security and resilience, allocate resources based on real-time evidence and turn operational data into valuable information, knowledge and insight. It is imperative that organisations help meet today’s and tomorrow’s challenges by making their data available, up-to-date and importantly reusable for a wide range of users, whatever their technical competency.

By unlocking data, businesses, government and citizens can work together to create more livable cities and drive change from the bottom up. Sharing and opening data is a transformative process both from an organisational as well as citizen engagement point of view.

Jürgen Schmidt
3 weeks ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

We’ve mostly moved past the point where our Internet of Things devices leak private information to anyone watching via unsecured connections, but that doesn’t mean you can stop being afraid. Never, ever stop being afraid. To top up your paranoia reserves, a new study finds that internet providers can, if they so choose, monitor all kinds of things from your smart home’s traitorous metadata.

The paper, from a team at Princeton’s computer science school led by grad student Noah Apthorpe, gets straight to the point: “we demonstrate that an ISP or other network observer can infer privacy sensitive in-home activities by analyzing internet traffic from smart homes containing commercially available IoT devices even when the devices use encryption.”

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