Last stories on 'Open data and privacy'
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Julian Sandler
yesterday
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

Ford and Silicon Valley-based Autonomic will work together to build a new open platform upon which cities can build out infrastructure communications, including connected traffic lights and parking spots, called the “Transportation Mobility Cloud.” Ford CEO Jim Hackett announced the news on Monday at the CES 2018 keynote kicking off the annual conference.

The platform is designed to help connect smart transportation services, as well as adjacent connected offerings, uniting them with one common language to help coordinate all this efforts in real-time. That means tying together personal cars with vehicle-to-everything communications built in, incorporating things like bike sharing networks, public and private transportation services, including buses, trains, ride hailing and beyond.

The Transportation Mobility Cloud will support location-based services, determining routes, sending out alerts about things like service disruptions, handing identity management and payment processing...

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Jürgen Schmidt
6 days ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Data collection, analysis, and integration, therefore, is critical in enabling informed and robust decision making for urban sustainability. In addressing the eleventh goal of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which aims at making cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable, the Global Pulse program has been initiated by the United Nations to explore opportunities and challenges in utilizing big data and analytics. The Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS) maintains a vast amount of data dealing with diverse issues concerning urban sustainability, including climate/weather, air, water, energy, building, land use, disaster risk management, agriculture, biodiversity, health, and economy. The Beijing City Lab demonstrates the usefulness of open urban data in mapping urbanization with a fine spatiotemporal scale and reflecting social and environmental dimensions of urbanization through visualization at multiple scales.

The basic principle of open data will generate s...

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Julian Sandler
3 weeks ago
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

In a recent conversation with New York City Chief Technology Officer, Miguel Gamiño, I asked, "What's your vision for a truly smart city? What will our lives look when we're there?" I asked because, despite all the recent advances that have been made in cities, I believe we still exist in the pre-smart-city era, or at least at the very early stages of its development. Connectivity seems far from ubiquitous, data is sequestered among private companies and separate government agencies, and smart pieces of infrastructure link to the Internet but often not to each other.

Gamiño, however, has been steadily improving on the status quo, balancing immediate service needs with his long-term vision for how a robust digital infrastructure can materially improve the lives of residents. He gave me an example of what one person's experience in a truly smart city might look like:

"Image you're driving home, using your smartphone to chart your route. Right now, those apps typically optimize driving times using a relatively small amount of traffic data they collect, plus information from a few other sources. But what if your route optimization included information about your intention for when you arrive, as well as the conditions of your destination?"

Jean-Paul Rouge
3 weeks ago
Jean-Paul Rouge
Independent professional

Equipping bustling metropolises with cutting-edge tech like the Internet of Things (IoT) can be a big money-saving move, according to a new ABI Research study commissioned by InterDigital's smart cities business, Chordant, in partnership with CA Technologies.

Worldwide, smart city technologies can end up saving governments, businesses and inhabitants more than $5 trillion each year by 2022, states the report. Those technologies include the IoT, artificial intelligence (AI), automation and data analytics.

The next five years may also see the rise of so-called "smart mega cities" with populations of around 10 million people. By studying 75 cities that currently have urban populations of more than five million people, ABI Research estimates that the governments operating smart mega cities can each save $4.95 billion a year by 2022, thanks to smart buildings, low-maintenance street lighting and other efficiency-boosting systems.

Enterprises can also benefit by being situated in a ...

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Julian Sandler
last month
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

Implementing the latest connected technologies can make cities feel like they are ready for whatever the future brings. The truth, of course, is that these technologies won’t last forever and they are going to be upgraded and replaced countless times as technology marches forward.

The question, then, becomes not just how are cities deploying technology for now, but how are city officials and IT leaders future-proofing their tech deployments in order to ensure the cities don’t become obsolete or isolated over the next decade?

Speaking at U.S. Data Innovation Day 2017 in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 5, three experts offered advice on how city IT leaders can ensure their systems are interoperable with new solutions and ones we haven’t even thought of yet.

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