Last stories on 'Open data and privacy'
START A NEW CONVERSTATION
Jaime González
2 days ago
Jaime González
Independent Professional

Dubai has been chosen as the Smart City of 2017 by the jury of the seventh edition of the Global Smart City Awards, announced at the Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona.

The Arab Emirate of Dubai’s project to adopt Blockchain Technology at a city scale earned the City award of 2017. The jury valued its effort to lead global thinking and deployment of blockchain technology in applicable government services as well as its commitment to support the creation of a blockchain industry empowering start-ups and businesses.

Other award winners include Amsterdam’s Circular Innovation programme, Shenzen’s Traffic Brain and SEAT’s Easy Urban Mobility.

Jose Suarez
2 weeks ago
Jose Suarez
Smart City Expert

States rely on data from connected technologies to streamline operations for local governments and improve city services for residents. But as governments begin to collect data through everything from smart utility meters to agency websites and street surveillance cameras, data privacy is becoming a major concern.

In fact, 79 percent of U.S. citizens are uneasy about the privacy and security of their personal digital data, according to an Accenture survey released in April. Moreover, 74 percent said they lacked confidence in the government’s ability to keep their data safe and 63 percent reported that they would feel more confident if government agencies and service providers had stronger data privacy and security policies in place.

So, what’s keeping states and local governments from ensuring citizens that data privacy is being taken seriously?

LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The benefits of smart city technologies are vast and quantifiable. They will save money and lives. We know that 60 percent of citizens would probably support a ballot initiative involving smart city initiatives in their community.

However, the benefits also come with risks. Relying on an infrastructure of millions of interconnected devices places security at a premium. The ability to infiltrate just one device could give hackers, terrorists or rogue nations the keys to wreak havoc on large population centers.

Without a secure cyber foundation, smart cities will crumble. Built on a secure cyber foundation, smart cities will thrive. We were encouraged to see that the proposed legislation specifically focused on developing a “skilled and savvy domestic workforce to support smart cities.”

At the heart of the secure smart cities of tomorrow will be a dynamic IT workforce, confident and capable of training and re-training on a consistent basis to stay ahead of the latest threats. O...

show more
LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

At Smart City InFocus in Yinchuan recently, 65 city leaders and technology companies gathered for a practical VIP workshop to figure out how we advance smart city transformation and move from open data platforms to true data economies.

Carl Piva, VP, Strategic Programs and Head of the Smart City Forum, TM Forum, kicked off the half-day symposium saying, ”We are all under pressure in cities – we don’t have the funds to do everything we want. That’s part of the reason TM Forum is bringing cities together with industry to find new ways to do things — moving away from transactional approaches to focusing on outcomes.”

He added: “We think the solution lies in collaborating ecosystems – it’s the key to smartness.”

These were some of the key takeaways from the session:

LABCITIES
last month
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Every year more and more municipalities around the world launch various Open Data initiatives in an attempt to align with modern neoliberal ideals of a progressive and transparent city.

For example, The Open Government Partnership launched in 2011 with just 8 participating countries “to make governments more open, accountable, and responsive to citizens”, now has more than 75 members. Another initiative - What Works Cities - now works with 90 mid-sized American cities to “enhance their use of data and evidence to improve services, inform local decision-making and engage residents.”

And it is clearly not for nothing - there are good reasons why cities should provide Open Data:

1. Open Data will increase transparency and reduce corruption. While this is a long term game, it is critical to start building an open society and system today.
2. Open Data will help modernize a municipality's internal mindset. A change in mindset is great for the city leadership and for cities as or...

show more
Sponsored
LABCITIES.TV