Last stories on 'People and citizens'
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Bart Gorynski
6 days ago
Bart Gorynski
Smartivist | @bee smart city

As expressed by a number of urban strategists in the past two years, we have witnessed a gradual shift towards citizen-centric smart city strategies. In an interesting article titled "Making cities smarter: How citizens' collective intelligence can guide better decision making" published by Deloitte University Press, the importance of citizen-centricity is presented clearly.

At bee smart city we completely agree with the authors and are convinced that collective intelligence is the key success factor for smart cities. Why? Because the acceptance and use of smart city solutions call for a user-centric approach that takes the needs and problems of citizens into account.

In the business world, it is widely known that an anticipation of “build it and they will come” is not the best course of action. Prior to implementing smart city solutions, it is important to know:
-why they are needed,
-how they can be implemented,
-what the benefits are for their users, and
-whether possible risks or objections exist.

Thus, to create a truly "smart" city, it is paramount:
-to enable citizen participation and collaboration,
-to facilitate active engagement in bottom-up thinking and co-creation, and
-to regard technology as an enabler that needs to be utilized in the right way

for identifying, developing and implementing suitable and citizen-focused solutions that transform into collective good.

Judit Urquijo
last week
Judit Urquijo
Content curator

McKinsey&Company publishes an interesting free report that explains how technologies, always focused from the point of view of the benefit they will bring to citizens, improve the quality of life in urban areas

Jean-Paul Rouge
2 weeks ago
Jean-Paul Rouge
Independent professional

Many cities around the world benefit from innovation and digitization strategies. Smart Cities initiatives provide the catalyst for urban communities to become more resilient and sustainable, affording economic efficiencies, environmental innovations, enhanced public security, smarter mobility, fresh economic activity and 21st-century jobs. Cities carry the brunt of modern day challenges (traffic congestion, air quality), but they also serve as a natural cradle to talent, jobs and innovations. Many modern cities are at the center of "geographies of innovation"; the wide distribution of residents in multi-jurisdictional regions surrounding a historical and densely populated city center.

Imperative to a successful wholesale smart strategy for all, is to take innovations beyond the city centers, facilitate larger regions and cater the digital enhancement of our communities, large or small. To not do so implies condoning a digital divide, with urban centers affording the riches of digit...

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Bart Gorynski
3 weeks ago
Bart Gorynski
Smartivist | @bee smart city

The process of achieving digital inclusion needs itself to be inclusive of all stakeholders across society. The co-creation of smart city policies and measures for digital inclusion should play a role in the wider co-creation of a generally more inclusive society.

Although the quantity of people using technology in their everyday lives is constantly rising, a relatively high percentage of the world’s population remains digitally disengaged or even technologically illiterate. In the European Union alone, nearly a third of people don’t use the internet on a daily basis; only half of all Europeans aged 16 - 74 use social networks or e-government services, and in some European countries up to 25% of people don’t have access to a computer from home.

As smart cities render our world more and more digital, and Information and Communications Technology (ICTs) play an increasingly important role in our daily lives, the ‘digital exclusion’ of certain population groups - notably those from ...

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Bart Gorynski
last month
Bart Gorynski
Smartivist | @bee smart city

Smart city initiatives need to not only be people-centric, but actually co-created by everyone in the community, if they are to be inclusive.

Many proponents of the smart city claim that it is by nature inclusive. However, like all other aspects of urban design and development, smart city initiatives frequently fail to fully prioritize inclusivity, often perpetuating the very issues that they aim to solve. As Gil Peñalosa, world-renowned urban designer, noted in a recent panel discussion on ‘The Invisible Smart City’: “we currently design our cities as though everyone is 30 and active”, leading to biased, inaccessible urban design that excludes what he calls the ‘silent majority’. Going one step further than this, Yves Raibaud, acclaimed sociologist and urban geographer, argues that cities are designed ‘by and for men’ (par et pour les hommes) - notably ‘western’, privileged men. This evidently leaves much to be desired in terms of diversity, and in turn inclusivity. Children, older...

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