Last stories on 'People and citizens'
START A NEW CONVERSTATION
Pieterjan Blondeel
last week
Pieterjan Blondeel
Head of Urban Operations at Joyn Belgium nv

Nowadays everything is smart. Your car, your phone and even your tootbrush. And you are also living in a city that becomes smarter by the day. They are smart and all talk to each other thanks to The Internet of Things.

Here is the problem with that: everything is getting smart but it does not mean everyone is getting smart(er).

Not everyone has a smartphone, not everyone knows how to access the internet and some of us don’t know how to drive. That’s nothing to be ashamed off. Not at all.

But the truth is that you are missing a lot of what’s happening. You are looking at a disprutive movement and have no clue what it is about. You can’t benefit the advantages. That’s not fair.

Jürgen Schmidt
2 weeks ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Governments are starting to use new information channels in decision support and policymaking – and some of those new information sources are constituents of the IoT.

Traditionally, governments decide on policy and exercise their power in a ‘top down’ model. The extent to which they reflect the will of the people varies tremendously, of course, and they may be subject to influence from lobbyists, think tanks and advisors, but in essence, governments tend to govern from on high.

Where connecting with the people is seen as desirable, however, policymakers have explored a variety of methods for gathering opinions and gauging public sentiment – and increasingly, information streams from people, animals and objects are part of an Internet of Governmental Things.

LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

When a group of five people convened in Washington D.C. on December 14, 2017, their primary goal as commissioners for the Federal Communications Commission was to vote on whether to overturn the 2015 regulations governing the internet commonly known as Net Neutrality, which supported "the idea that Internet service providers (ISPs) should treat all data that travels over their networks fairly, without improper discrimination in favor of particular apps, sites or services".

The controversy leading up to the FCC's decision to kill Net Neutrality included accusations by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai that Twitter was using its platform to discriminate against those who agreed with Pai's agenda and his own commisioner accusing Pai of ignoring investment data that did not fit his narrative as well as the request of more than two dozen Senators that the hearing be delayed until reports could be investigated that more than 1 million comments submitted to the FCC were written by bots and included c...

show more
LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The future of our cities is undoubtedly smart. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Automated Learning are set to revolutionise the way data is collected, managed and implemented in our lives. So how can education help?

To most people, these techy terms inspire nothing but thoughts of an epic World War Z-esque battle between men and machine. But, through education, these fears of the fictitious fall of humanity can be replaced with knowledge on how to navigate our future concrete jungles and understanding on how we propel it to human-centred development.

With AI, cities can soon enough cities run on its own. Street lights can learn when the sun sets at different times of year through data input, and work out what time they need to turn on without a human managing it. Pedestrian crossings can create their own algorithms to decide how long would be needed for people to cross the road without humans having to input a manual code. Self-driving cars could even learn to determine the quickest route home after work without the driver even having to press a button.

LABCITIES
last month
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

eople continue to flock to cities for several reasons, such as employment opportunities, lifestyle, and more.

The latest U.S. Census Bureau data showed that all but one of the 20 largest cities in the U.S. experienced population growth last year. And with the exception of New York City, the 15 cities that had the greatest population growth were in the southern and western portions of the country.

As this migration continues, cities will need to become more efficient in order to keep up with the surging population. Thus, smart cities will start to become the norm in the major metropolitan areas of the world.

But what is a smart city?

Quite simply, smart cities use Internet of Things (IoT) devices such as connected sensors, lights, and meters to collect and analyze data. The cities then use this data to improve infrastructure, public utilities and services, and more.

Below, we've outlined how smart cities provide a more efficient and higher quality lifestyle for their residents, and the methods they use to reach these goals.

Sponsored
LABCITIES.TV