Last stories on 'People and citizens'
START A NEW CONVERSTATION
LABCITIES
yesterday
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

One of the most important challenges for cities and communities is working together and sharing knowledge. But to make sure collaboration is relevant and effective, it is crucial to understand the issues that city leaders struggle with in their smart city projects.

The Global Smart City and Community Coalition visited the New York Smart City Expo, May 2017. Here, in line with the message of Mayor de Blasio, we have asked cities’ CIO/CTOs what concrete struggles they face with their smart city projects and what they would like to learn from other cities.

The result of the interviews with these key innovators from Amsterdam, Austin, Atlanta, Chicago, Eindhoven, New York and The Hague is aligned in the segmented videos in each paragraph, and will guide you through a diverse list of challenges for city officials with regards to local collaboration and thematic issues like mobility and city services.

Thibault Van Der Auwermeulen
5 days ago
Thibault Van Der Auwermeulen
Founder of 4Instance (public management) & ExpoPolis (virtuel fair software)

"Smart City Virtual Expo connects government officials with vendors"

I believe the public sector will be more and more interested working with startups.
A startup stands for: Innovation, Creativity, Flexibility, Smart approach and AFFORDABLE.

But how can both "public sector" and "startups" meet each other ?

Julian Sandler
5 days ago
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

Attract members of the "creative class" to a city and they will create jobs and spur urban renewal. But that idea, championed by noted urbanologist Richard Florida, has a double-edged downside: increased economic segregation and less affordable housing. Economics correspondent reports on how Florida wrestles with that tension in his latest book, "The New Urban Crisis."

Giovanni Silva
last week
Giovanni Silva
Smart City Expert

This week Sadiq Khan opened up London Tech Week, proclaiming in his speech that he wanted to make London the “Smartest city in the world”.

The word ‘smart’ in this context does not mean providing better education for Londoners. Instead, it means using technology to best automate, structure and arrange the city’s infrastructure, to make it work better for all of us.

Khan is right to say that London’s need to smarten up: across our old, expansive city, many different solutions are needed. And global conglomerates are dedicating thousands of hours and millions of dollars to aggregating big swaths of data to determine how to improve the places we live – not to mention, how to better target us as customers. From driverless cars to seeing eye robots, the assumption is that these solutions will be better for all of us – and our cities will be better because of them.

This word ‘smart’ is mentioned in reference to cities a lot. There are endless conferences and trade fairs exploring ‘smart cities’ or ‘Internet of things’ technologies. Most cities now have tech weeks – and the term is now so regarded that it’s often capitalised as ‘SMART’. But spending time in this world, hearing from the many mayors at the many conferences, you start to wonder who these solutions are being tailored for, and what aspects of city life are they ignoring, often unintentionally.

LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

What challenges do smart city leaders struggle with in their smart city initiatives? And could it be that many of the challenges in any city, have already ben tackled in any city somewhere else in the world? In other words, what can cities learn form other cities? In the video below, recorded at the New York Smart City Expo, these questions were asked to various City CIO’s and CTO’s.

Unlike countries, cities have less burdens to work together, learn from each other and share knowledge. And in oreder to be able to collaborate effectively, it is important to have a view of the challenges with which smart city leaders are dealing.

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