Last stories on 'Sustainability and environment'
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James Bell
5 days ago
James Bell
Smart City Expert

Revolution in technology and industries in the past decades lead to a new debate among the world leaders on ‘global warming’ and ‘climate change’. The debate still remains open and on with questions like ‘who is responsible’, ‘to what extent these problems are man-made’ and ‘what can be done to get rid of the crisis’. Here, let us skip the first two questions (as they are really not as important as the solution) and focus on what should be done to overcome the adverse environmental crisis on our planet.

Though at the regional level the effects of global warming are not clearly visible, at the global level it is accelerating faster than humans can handle. With the trend creeping ahead from past 50 years, the hottest years in the history were recorded since 1990. Considering what the scientists have to say, if the emissions responsible for global warming are not stopped from increasing ‘now’, the average global temperatures can rise from 3 to 9 degrees in the later years of 21st century – we all know it will lead to rise in sea level, drought, rising storms, flooding, wildfire, and heating up of ocean currents affecting the human life with most dangerous outcomes. We need to act now by understanding how we need to begin and in which direction.

Jürgen Schmidt
6 days ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Data collection, analysis, and integration, therefore, is critical in enabling informed and robust decision making for urban sustainability. In addressing the eleventh goal of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which aims at making cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable, the Global Pulse program has been initiated by the United Nations to explore opportunities and challenges in utilizing big data and analytics. The Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS) maintains a vast amount of data dealing with diverse issues concerning urban sustainability, including climate/weather, air, water, energy, building, land use, disaster risk management, agriculture, biodiversity, health, and economy. The Beijing City Lab demonstrates the usefulness of open urban data in mapping urbanization with a fine spatiotemporal scale and reflecting social and environmental dimensions of urbanization through visualization at multiple scales.

The basic principle of open data will generate s...

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Judit Urquijo
6 days ago
Judit Urquijo
Content curator

A recent study by Harvard’s TH Chan School of Public Health suggests that even the levels of air pollution below legal limits are harmful for human health, at least among the population over 65s. I believe that these circumstances make the internet of things look like an effective tool for continuous monitoring, allowing us to take the most opportune measures, don't you think?

Giovanni Silva
last month
Giovanni Silva
Smart City Expert

Running an island is hard work. Sure, some like Ibiza thrive as vacation destinations and profit from tourism, but due to their insularity, many are heavily dependent on energy—especially fossil fuels. Islands are also faced with the challenge of maintaining (or creating) a sustainable local environment and ecosystem while still managing issues such as high transportation costs and pollution. With about 11 percent of the world’s population living on islands, this becomes an issue not just for tourism, but also for the actual residents. As the EU looks to be a driver in terms of a low carbon economy, islands in Europe are becoming more aware of their role to serve as inspiration for sustainable, integrated solutions that “make the most out of islands’ competitive advantages,” according to the Smart Islands Initiative. Let’s take a look at this new effort inspired by Smart Cities and Communities and how Europe’s islands may play a vital role in helping Europe transition into a low carbon and sustainable economy.

James Bell
last month
James Bell
Smart City Expert

UN predictions indicate that in 2050, the demographics of urban areas will be fairly equal to the total population of the world in 2002. With constant development of the cities, economic, social and creative opportunities increase which forms the major attraction for the inflow of population.

As per the estimates from McKinsey, the top 600 cities in the world will account for 60% GDP by 2025. In no time, the smart city industry will be a $400 billion market by 2020. But the fact still remains that urbanisation comes hand in hand with some major challenges which are faced commonly by the world’s fastest growing cities.

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