Last stories on 'Sustainability and environment'
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Bart Gorynski
3 days ago
Bart Gorynski
Smartivist | @bee smart city

A growing number of cities around the globe are testing smart waste management solutions to create higher efficiency in terms of resources and costs associated with keeping their cities clean.

While equipping the bins of private households with latest sensor technology is tested only by a few cities (like Santander in Spain or Montreal in Canada), several cities start in public spaces with implementing smart waste management solutions.

The installation of smart solar-powered compacting bins can be observed in a growing number of cities (Amsterdam, Atlanta, London, Melbourne, Philadelphia, and others).

An impressive example is the case study of “smart bins” adopted by Nambucca Shire Council in Australia that led to great results over the past years. They installed the BigBelly smart bin of world leading company BigBelly Inc. from Needham, MA in the United States that specializes in smart waste and recycling solutions for smart cities. A growing number of other companies are offering similar products in the growing smart waste management market, e.g. SmartBin from Dublin, Ireland or Ecube Labs from Seoul, South Korea. Read more....

Bart Gorynski
last week
Bart Gorynski
Smartivist | @bee smart city

The City of Espoo was awarded 'Intelligent Community of the Year 2018' at ICF Summit in London. Espoo is the first European City to receive this award. Congratulations!

Espoo has solidly grasped the need for collaboration in its smart city solutions. It involves all stakeholders at all levels to ensure a citizen-centric model for innovation.

Second in size to Helsinki and its neighbor on Finland’s southern coast, Espoo boasts a population of around 270,000 people – a significant increase from the 22,000 who called it home just a generation ago. Having transformed from a regional municipality into an industrial city with a large number of residents working in electronics and engineering, Espoo is now being recognized for its developments as an intelligent community.

It certainly has a strong basis for the generation and application of smart city solutions, with its focus on citizen access to enabling technologies. The spread of mobile broadband access, for example, was support...

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LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Articles about technology and the future of transportation rarely used to get far without mentioning jetpacks: a staple of science fiction from the 1920s onwards, the jetpack became a reality in the 1960s in the shape of devices such as the Bell Rocket Belt. But despite many similar efforts, the skies over our cities remain stubbornly free of jetpack-toting commuters.

For a novel form of transport to make a material difference to our lives, several key requirements must be satisfied. Obviously the new technology must work safely, and operate within an appropriate regulatory framework. But public acceptance and solid business models are also vital if a new idea is to move from R&D lab to testbed to early adoption, and eventually into mainstream usage.

There's inevitably a lot of hype surrounding the future of transportation, but also plenty of substance, with big investments being made both by disruptive tech companies and by incumbent industry players. Can technology help to get us and our goods around quicker, in greater safety, and with less damage to the planet?

Judit Urquijo
3 weeks ago
Judit Urquijo
Content curator

Last May 23 I had the opportunity to follow a webinar organized by Eye on Earth in which Dr. Lucas Joppa, Chief Environmental Scientist at Microsoft, presented some of the projects related to the environment that are being developed within the AI for Earth project.

I found the classification of land use from satellite imagery (valid only for the US) fascinating. In the video you can see the test I did a few days ago. The possibilities of this tool are, certainly, more than interesting, speeding up the creation of cartography, for example.

Here are the links to view the webinar and try out the tool

- Webinar (registration required): http://bit.ly/webinar-AI-for-Earth
- Github repository: https://github.com/vannizhang/aiforearth-landcover-app
- Tool: https://vannizhang.github.io/aiforearth-landcover-app/build/# (if it doesn't work well, try installing Node.js - https://nodejs.org/en/)
- More information about AI for Earth: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/aiforearth

LABCITIES
last month
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Is Smart City really the solution oWorldwide, cities are responsible for two thirds of energy consumption and 70 to 80% of greenhouse gas emissions. We also know that in the coming decades, 95% of population growth will take place in urban areas, due to a rural exodus caused by the excessive poverty of farmers who can no longer compete on their own land. However, according to Hammer et al (2011)[1], the lower the urban density, the higher the energy consumption for electricity and transport, which is proven by the fact that per capita CO2 emissions fall with increasing urban density.

Does this mean that urbanization and urban densification are solutions to energy and climate challenges? Is it the same issue for the countries of the North and the South? How will we feed the cities if the countryside is empty? How can agriculture and its production methods be associated with these challenges?f tomorrow?

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