Last stories on 'Homes and hospitality'
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LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

It’s no secret that we are relying on smart technology more than ever before in an attempt to achieve greater efficiency in our homes. In fact, last year 80 million smart home devices were shipped worldwide.

Thanks to the internet of things (IoT) our households aren’t only able to become smarter and more savvy, but safer and more secure too.

The IoT is shaping and advancing home security through an extensive range of products, apps and devices; we no longer have to rely on grainy CCTV footage and ‘beware of the dog’ signs to deter opportunist thieves, we can go as far as streaming high quality real time footage of our homes directly to our smartphones.

There is no doubt that smart security and the IoT will transform, shape and enhance our homes, so what smart devices can you expect to have as common features of your home over the coming years?

Darshan Kalsariya
last week
Darshan Kalsariya
Smart City Expert

Imagine a world in which every device in the home, workplace and car are connected. A world where the lights automatically turn on when the car approaches the driveway. When the morning alarm goes off and the front door automatically unlocks when approached by a member of the household, but stays locked when a stranger arrives on the front step. When the lights of your street in your control. When the Fan, AC, All electric switches of your home is in your control to access from anywhere in world. That is the type of world the Internet of Things can create.

Currently, the “Internet of Things” is not a second Internet – rather it’s a network of devices that are connected to the Internet like your mobile phone that is used every day to search Google, upload images and connect with friends. It’s a network of products that are connected to the Internet, thus they have their own IP address and can connect to each other to automate simple as well tough tasks.

“The current state of the I...

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Jean-Paul Rouge
last month
Jean-Paul Rouge
Independent professional

Smart homes are considered by some the hallmark of IoT, and with the growth of the industry, increasing numbers of companies want to get in on the action, developing and rolling out smart devices. According to data from consulting firm McKinsey & Company, the U.S. smart home market will reach $29 million by the end of this year.

Although people have embraced technology in their day-to-day life, when it comes to security and safety, people don’t want to take any risks. No company can yet claim that its technology and smart access control services are invulnerable. Enhancing the quality of safety and security services will contribute heavily to the success of smart access control companies, and even the smart and connected home industry as a whole.

The market will, in the future, need more interaction and cooperation between companies, rather than endless competition. Connected devices form the basis of the entire smart home industry — so why shouldn’t companies connect as well?

If companies focus on their own products without regard for other devices in the market, users will not be able to experience the seamless lifestyle smart devices promise.

Jose Suarez
2 months ago
Jose Suarez
Smart City Expert

Lately, smart devices have been synonymous with anything that’s network enabled. Whether that be lights (Phillips Hue), thermostats (Nest), or even toothbrushes (Prophix). But it’s more than just the abilities enabled by connecting a device to internet that make it ‘smart’. It’s a combination of services, trust, and ease of use that make a smart device a better choice for a consumer than a dumb one.

LABCITIES
6 months ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The Internet of Things has always been more of an idea than an industry. The idea: connect everything.

At its most simple, the concept of the Internet of Things is to put a sensor and a modem on everything and connect it to the cloud. At its most complex, those things employ a sophisticated system of sensors, modems, processors, operating systems, cloud integration, apps, displays, voice platforms and machine learning. Think of the difference between a simple Bluetooth beacon and LG’s new InstaView smart refrigerator.

To categorize all of these things under the umbrella of “the Internet of Things” is absurd. It is true that most connected things share some common traits. The hardware and software are outgrowths of the mobile ecosystem, which was an evolution of the PC and Internet generation. Internet of Things objects are not redefining the notion of compute … they are just adding a whole lot more surface area and complexity.

As the Internet of Things loses definition from a conceptual level, what has it become? The connected world has a foot in just about every business, personal and governmental sector, to varying degrees of maturity.

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