Last stories on 'Transportation and parking'
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LABCITIES
3 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Global urbanization is seemingly unstoppable, and with more and more citizens, the cost of living in cities is skyrocketing, threatening to increase social inequality, slow down economic growth and push up crime levels. Smart cities are said to provide the solution to this problem by implementing technology into city projects to help reduce costs.

Technology has therefore brought city infrastructure to the forefront of our agendas – and increasingly citizens are embracing smart homes, and local and national governments are promoting smart technology initiatives, from smart street lighting to driverless public transport. There’s no denying it, smart cities are no longer a thing of the future. They’re very much here.

But becoming a smart city is more than simply reveling in technology advancements. According to a recent study conducted by ABI Research, in partnership with InterDigital, on behalf of its Smart Cities-focused business, ChordantTM, and CA Technologies, the scope for ef...

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Marc Van Steyvoort
5 days ago
Marc Van Steyvoort
Co-Founder at LABCITIES

A time ago i could find info on Pavement Scanner that has been specifically developed for Road Condition Assessment completely, independent from limitations regarding the speed of the mobile survey platform while offering utmost measuring accuracy in the sub-mm range :The 3D Pavement Surface LiDAR System

I wonder where this service positions in added value , where it positions in price compared to actual solutions, where the service is used already and who Haptic sees as the end customer for such a product.

Jürgen Schmidt
last week
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

It’s 2043. Few people in cities own cars anymore. It’s cheaper to rely on electric, self-driving taxis. Some vehicles are big enough to share; others are individually sized to make the most of limited street space. They have one button inside: Stop. Dynamic curbs — patrolled by enforcement droids — remain clear for deliveries, pick-ups, and drop-offs. Street parking no longer exists, and this space has been recaptured for better public uses.

That’s the future as seen by David Levinson, the University of Sydney transport professor who writes the popular Transportist blog and is co-author of the 2017 book The End of Traffic and the Future of Access. “Look back to the 1920s, and you have magazines that ask: What does the future look like?” he says. “Some of it is absurd. Why would we all be using blimps? But some of it’s still like: Why doesn’t the future look like that?”

The truth, he says, is that imagining tomorrow’s urban mobility raises far more questions than it answers. If we get used to the idea of using taxis, what other things will we no longer feel the need to own? What are the new things we now can do because robots can move around without supervision? What will we do with all the extra time we don’t have to spend driving? How do you allocate road space in a world with delivery drones?

Jürgen Schmidt
2 weeks ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Imagine a major airport with no air traffic control tower. Collisions and crashes would be commonplace. Circling aircraft would run out of fuel and drop from the sky. Planes would be stacked up on runways, stopped on tarmacs and stuck at gates. Chaos would reign. What was once regarded as reliable, if not slightly annoying, air transportation would become a daily dance with death.

Thankfully, the air traffic control tower–the airport’s brain and nerve center–prevents such catastrophes and confines air passengers’ grievances to security queues, cramped seating and dubious food.

Now imagine street traffic in any major city in the world. Gridlock, congestion, transit overcrowding and pollution contribute to an infuriating commute experience.

Why does traffic control exist for air but not for ground transportation? There’s the safety factor, obviously. Even though fatalities are much higher in cars than planes. But there’s also a practical reason: limited runway space. There is far too much demand for landing slots at major airports.

Julian Sandler
3 weeks ago
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

By 2050, over 70% of the world’s population is expected to be living in a city. Most people look at the city as a crime-riddled space with crawled housing systems and exceptionally little fresh air to breathe, but they often don’t realise that cities can be some of the greenest places to live in. It’s all about how you decrease your carbon footprint on the environment as a human community.

Cities also offer a unique setting for resources, people, opportunities and ideas to converge and spur new avenues of innovation, technology and thought. And with these innovations, we require innovation in technological and urban development to involve a conscious urge to save the environment.

It is expected that the cities of tomorrow will evolve into highly efficient and highly technical habitats for larger populations. The infrastructure necessary for this will include a range of technologies that are used for skyscrapers, personalised public transportation systems, sustainable green spaces...

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