Last stories on 'Transportation and parking'
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Julian Sandler
yesterday
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

Ford and Silicon Valley-based Autonomic will work together to build a new open platform upon which cities can build out infrastructure communications, including connected traffic lights and parking spots, called the “Transportation Mobility Cloud.” Ford CEO Jim Hackett announced the news on Monday at the CES 2018 keynote kicking off the annual conference.

The platform is designed to help connect smart transportation services, as well as adjacent connected offerings, uniting them with one common language to help coordinate all this efforts in real-time. That means tying together personal cars with vehicle-to-everything communications built in, incorporating things like bike sharing networks, public and private transportation services, including buses, trains, ride hailing and beyond.

The Transportation Mobility Cloud will support location-based services, determining routes, sending out alerts about things like service disruptions, handing identity management and payment processing...

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LABCITIES
2 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Each year heralds in a new wave of predictions when it comes to the trends and technology that will be sweeping over smart cities—and developing new ones. In 2017, European cities saw the rise of smart city solutions like electric vehicles, smart parking and street lighting, and free (and fast) Internet. 5G, for example, was a hot topic at tech conferences as companies partnered up with cities to get the networks in place for this high-speed service. We saw cities look to options from sustainable building to smart transportation as ways to cut carbon emissions and become smarter for long-long term success. This comes as no surprise to over half the global population living in cities over the past decade, and the UN predicting that more than 70 percent of people will live in urban areas by 2050. In 2014 there were only 28 megacities (cities with more than 10 million inhabitants), and that number is expected to multiply to more than 650 by 2030. Below, we’ll take a look at the top trends predicted to drive the smart city market in 2018 that cities across Europe should keep in mind when putting their own strategies and solutions in place.

LABCITIES
5 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The wait for the self-driving future is coming to an end. The earliest real-world applications of autonomous vehicles will arrive in 2018.

Starting in Phoenix this year, a small number of commuters will be riding in driverless Chrysler Pacifica minivans as part of a trial conducted by Waymo, the self-driving car unit owned by Google’s parent company. For the first time, ordinary people just trying to get to work will be interacting with autonomous vehicles. Waymo has promised to broaden the test to a wider market soon.

Other major players will spend this year preparing for the imminent introduction of driverless vehicles. By 2019, General Motor Co. expects to deploy electric Chevy Bolt robot taxis in big U.S. cities. Uber Technologies Inc. has also pledged to launch a fleet of self-driving Volvo XC90 sport-utility vehicles in that time frame. Tesla Inc. missed a self-imposed deadline for a coast-to-coast driverless excursion by the end of 2017, but Chief Executive Officer Elon Mu...

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Jason Black
last week
Jason Black
Project Manager

A £13.4 million initiative to create a driverless transport testing area based in the Royal Borough of Greenwich and nearby Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London is due to be up and running by spring 2019.

Loughborough University, the lead academic partner, has been awarded £500,000 as part of the project to develop a research programme enabling a real-world working test bed for connected and autonomous vehicles.

The Smart Mobility Living Lab, where London will enable companies to trial their ideas, technology and services within complex public environments; helping them develop new vehicle systems and big city transport applications.

James Bell
last week
James Bell
Smart City Expert

While the urban population will remain relatively constant in the most developed nations of the world, in developing countries the number is going to double from 2010 to 2050. This sole fact is enough for the developing nations to speed up at building more sustainable cities for the coming generations.

Considering the other side, depending on the kind of resources available, funds from private and public sector along with successful collaborations, developing regions have seen a rapid growth in many dimensions in the recent years. Among all, the transport system has witnessed a crucial development phase in some of the African and Asian cities. There is a high potential in these regions to set up better transport systems. A lot of holistic strategies adopted by some of the European and American cities can be useful for the developing nations. Alongside, what should be the focus and where it needs to be diverted is discussed below.

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