Last stories on 'Transportation and parking'
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Giovanni Silva
3 days ago
Giovanni Silva
Smart City Expert

A lot of writing and research on autonomous vehicles (AVs) has focused on technology and deployment (for example, this recent article that speculates about which automaker is better situated to develop AVs). Less attention has been directed at identifying and addressing potential secondary impacts, such as the consequences of AV deployment for urban design. Secondary implications could end up being the largest obstacles to the successful rollout of AVs—particularly with regard to the disruption, and direct backlash, the rollout will create. These secondary implications also highlight the importance of scenario and uncertainty planning.

In this context, the Transportation Research Board recent hosted an "Urbanism Next" workshop at the Autonomous Vehicles Symposium (AVS 2017), which the authors helped organize, to examine the potential impacts of AVs and the sharing economy on e-commerce, city form, design, and development. While AVS 2017 focused on AV technology (e.g., their operatin...

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Daniel Jessop
5 days ago
Daniel Jessop
Smart City Expert

Taking place 19th & 20th June at Arena MK, the City Transport and Traffic Innovation (CiTTi) Exhibition is an an exciting event which gathers the industry together to explore the movement of goods and people through an urban environment safely and efficiently.

Visitors passes are completely free and give you full access to all of the solutions on offer, live demonstrations of cutting edge technology and informative free seminars where visitors can learn from the minds behind the latest transport and traffic innovation.

Get your free pass to discover the innovation of today’s technological landscape and changing environment when it comes to transport and traffic within cities.

LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

This is what the street of the future looks like.

So says a prediction from the Smart Cities Council, a government supported group mapping out the future of urban development in Australia.

The visualisation shows sci-fi-style technology like flying cars, stackable bicycle stands and Blade Runner-inspired holographic projections.

The Smart Cities display at Sydney's Circular Quay depicts a future using technology that already exists – self-driving public transport, electric cars and interactive games as play equipment.

Jürgen Schmidt
last week
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

The report ‘Towards New Urban Mobility: The case of London and Berlin’ provides insight into how urban transport policy can better leverage new and emerging mobility choices in cities. Drawing on the LSE Cities/InnoZ household survey of 1,000 residents each in Berlin and London, it investigates how people’s attitudes towards transport modes, technology and travel frame their willingness to adopt new and more sustainable forms of transport.

The study demonstrates how London and Berlin have both seen a pronounced trend towards new urban mobility with considerable increases in walking, cycling, public and shared transport, as well as substantial reductions in car use and ownership. It reveals that less than one in six residents in each city display a strong identification with car use and ownership, for reasons primarily including higher costs, adequate alternatives and environmental concerns. Such shifts have been accompanied by a large proportion of residents in both cities showing openness to new mobility services with travel applications being used almost daily by one in four of the respondents who owned smartphones.

LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Parking and traffic congestion are constant sources of frustration for drivers, merchants, employers and public officials in cities worldwide. For this reason, smart parking services are top of mind with public officials, parking agencies, IT and innovation executives. Many smart city projects incorporate a smart parking element.

While smart parking solutions improve visibility for drivers and parking enforcement officers, that is not where the real innovation lies. In a previous article, I wrote that IoT innovation is not in the solution. It is in what it allows organizations to become – agile, intelligent, and adaptive.In the age of “smart” and the Internet of Things (IoT), it’s easy to see why smart parking solutions are considered innovative. Sensors embedded in the ground, or cameras mounted on light poles or building structures, determine whether the parking spaces are occupied or available. This data is routed wirelessly to a gateway, and relayed to a central cloud-based smart parking platform. It is combined with data from other sensors to create a real time parking map.

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