Last stories on 'Government and administration'
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LABCITIES
2 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Each year heralds in a new wave of predictions when it comes to the trends and technology that will be sweeping over smart cities—and developing new ones. In 2017, European cities saw the rise of smart city solutions like electric vehicles, smart parking and street lighting, and free (and fast) Internet. 5G, for example, was a hot topic at tech conferences as companies partnered up with cities to get the networks in place for this high-speed service. We saw cities look to options from sustainable building to smart transportation as ways to cut carbon emissions and become smarter for long-long term success. This comes as no surprise to over half the global population living in cities over the past decade, and the UN predicting that more than 70 percent of people will live in urban areas by 2050. In 2014 there were only 28 megacities (cities with more than 10 million inhabitants), and that number is expected to multiply to more than 650 by 2030. Below, we’ll take a look at the top trends predicted to drive the smart city market in 2018 that cities across Europe should keep in mind when putting their own strategies and solutions in place.

LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

One smart city mayor says to enterprise execs “Don’t come to us with solutions, ask us what we want to do.” What’s the best way for P3s to come together?

The answer lies in our history and the path towards emerging tools and technologies. The essence of P3 innovation in the future will not be in the realm of financial engineering, although new forms of new structuring will certainly be vital to their success.

Over the past two centuries, nothing has reshaped our lives more fundamentally than technological innovations.

The forces unleashed by earlier innovations created opportunities for the men who would later become railroad tycoons, steel barons, and bankers. Many of them were keenly interested in driving the U.S. westward, using an extensive network that linked railways, enabled unprecedented commerce, communications, and settlement.

Their railroads fundamentally altered America’s economic and political geography, and how people thought about the previously distant front...

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Jürgen Schmidt
2 weeks ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Governments are starting to use new information channels in decision support and policymaking – and some of those new information sources are constituents of the IoT.

Traditionally, governments decide on policy and exercise their power in a ‘top down’ model. The extent to which they reflect the will of the people varies tremendously, of course, and they may be subject to influence from lobbyists, think tanks and advisors, but in essence, governments tend to govern from on high.

Where connecting with the people is seen as desirable, however, policymakers have explored a variety of methods for gathering opinions and gauging public sentiment – and increasingly, information streams from people, animals and objects are part of an Internet of Governmental Things.

LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

When a group of five people convened in Washington D.C. on December 14, 2017, their primary goal as commissioners for the Federal Communications Commission was to vote on whether to overturn the 2015 regulations governing the internet commonly known as Net Neutrality, which supported "the idea that Internet service providers (ISPs) should treat all data that travels over their networks fairly, without improper discrimination in favor of particular apps, sites or services".

The controversy leading up to the FCC's decision to kill Net Neutrality included accusations by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai that Twitter was using its platform to discriminate against those who agreed with Pai's agenda and his own commisioner accusing Pai of ignoring investment data that did not fit his narrative as well as the request of more than two dozen Senators that the hearing be delayed until reports could be investigated that more than 1 million comments submitted to the FCC were written by bots and included c...

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LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Hong Kong has released its "Smart City Blueprint" to guide its leaders in achieving their vision of becoming a world-class smart city. The blueprint maps out development plans for the next five years and beyond.

The plan is based on a study the government commissioned that contains short-, medium- and long-term plans in six "smart" areas: mobility, living, environment, people, government and economy.

The smart city plan is touted as being "people-centric" and the goal is to benefit residents and visitors with the smart innovations. The roadmap also aims to make Hong Kong more sustainable and economically attractive to global businesses and talent through its innovation.

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