Last stories on 'Monitoring and benchmarking'
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Jason Black
yesterday
Jason Black
Project Manager

A new study by Juniper Research has identified the top 10 smart cities in the UK, with London topping the list. The analysis was conducted over a range of city indices, including transport, healthcare, public safety, energy and productivity. Scores were calculated according to diverse metrics, including present state-of-play variables (such as congestion and crime levels) alongside smart city rollouts, vision and long-term strategy.

LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Many US citizens and government officials are excited about the prospect of smart cities, but they also have concerns about issues such as paying for these initiatives, ensuring cybersecurity and privacy, and addressing a lack of needed technology skills.

That's according to a new study from technology industry association CompTIA, which surveyed 1,000 US households and 350 government officials on their awareness and interest in the concept of smart communities.

The report, "Building Smarter Cities and Communities," said six in 10 citizens would be interested in living in a smart city, although only 26 percent said they are familiar with the smart city concept. Sixty percent would support a ballot initiative involving smart city initiatives in their community.

Improved public Wi-Fi and broadband connectivity; monitoring of air quality; better water resource management; energy efficiency; and disaster monitoring and response are among the smart city use cases citizens are most interested in, according to the study.

LABCITIES
last month
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Government leaders today face high volumes of workflow and citizen demand with increasingly tight budgets. Not surprisingly, this often causes a risk-averse environment. Yet cities that build room for creativity, innovation — and yes, risk — open up the opportunity to do more with less. The smart cities movement is all about enhancing processes and improving efficiencies.

Even so, there’s a notion that becoming a smart city takes a big upfront investment. There are smart city pretenders that try to convince local governments to replace working equipment with expensive and unnecessary “smart” machinery. Cities should instead seek out technology that enhances their existing infrastructure.

LABCITIES
last month
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

For years we’ve been recorded in public on security cameras, police bodycams, livestreams, other people’s social media posts, and on and on. But even if there’s a camera in our face, there’s always been a slight assurance that strangers wouldn’t really be able to do anything that affects us with the footage. The time and effort it would take for someone to trawl through months of security footage to find a specific person, or search the internet on the off-chance they’ll find you is just unrealistic. But not for robots.

Long possible in Hollywood thrillers, the tools for identifying who someone is and what they’re doing across video and images are taking shape. Companies like Facebook and Baidu have been working on such artificial intelligence-powered technology for years. But the narrowing rate of error and widening availability of these systems foretell a near future when every video is analyzed to identify the people, objects, and actions inside.

Artificial intelligence resear...

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Jose Suarez
last month
Jose Suarez
Smart City Expert

ast year’s United Nations-brokered agreement on the future of cities, the New Urban Agenda, embraced many of today’s trends in urban planning and management made possible by new technologies. From smart cities to data collection, the high-tech possibilities of urban data centres and street-level monitoring tools were all given the U. N.’s stamp of approval.

But for geographer Federico Caprotti of the University of Exeter, who studies smart cities, the rush deserves some pause. What if new technology further exacerbates urban inequality, especially among those on the wrong side of the digital divide? Caprotti sees the world heading toward a notion of a “new urban citizen”, one that continually provides data, which may leave out those who are unable or unwilling to contribute. For example, how to fit in the individual who does not own a smartphone, whether out of choice or for economic reasons?

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