Last stories on 'Energy and water'
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Jürgen Schmidt
3 days ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

In 1900, just 15% of the world’s population lived in cities. Now that proportion is over 50%, which is a lot of people. In fact, it means around 4 billion human beings rely on urban infrastructure to keep them warm, mobile and clean.

Technology helps with this of course. Digital sensors, smart phones and smart home appliances allow for a new kind of understanding between citizens and city officials. In this so-called “smart city”, information and communication technologies (ICT) and the internet of things (IoT) are used to enhance city living. Smart cities are a major part of achieving the goal set by the United Nations of making urban environments “inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”.

Water infrastructure is often overlooked when smart cities are considered or discussed. This seems strange when water services are so crucial for human health and well-being. But water is often seen as an “invisible utility” which is taken for granted. The industry has also been slow to harness the power of new technology.

One thing is certain though – water should be a key element of the smart city concept. And there are two major ways in which smart water technologies will be coming soon to a city near you.

LABCITIES
4 days ago
LABCITIES
By Marc Van Steyvoort

Trials in Denmark carried out by Nissan Motor Co. and Italy’s biggest utility Enel SpA showed how batteries inside electric cars could help balance supply and demand at times and provide a new revenue stream for those who own the vehicles
( Source Bloomberg Technology )

James Bell
4 days ago
James Bell
Smart City Expert

Planning and envisioning smart cities has become a big priority for governments across the world. Smart cities offer big attraction for business and the technological convenience created for residents seems to create a great vision of a utopic future. In recent years, many countries are fast initiating new Smart Cities or retrofitting technologies in existing cities. While these are a welcome change for the citizens, initiatives of this nature require larger overall perspectives and decisions must be made with an understanding of the risks involved.

Jean-Paul Rouge
3 weeks ago
Jean-Paul Rouge
Independent professional

For Pittsburgh, it’s a focus on improving air quality and creating renewable energy jobs. For Paris, it’s encouraging social mobility and reclaiming pedestrian areas. The common thread in these cities’ climate action plans is a commitment to pledges made by 197 parties in the landmark Paris Agreement.

“The only way to do right by Pittsburghers and Parisians is to abide by the principles of the Paris Agreement, which guarantees the future health and prosperity of both of our cities – and every other city in the world,” wrote Mayors William Peduto and Anne Hidalgo in The New York Times in response to President Donald Trump’s rationale for pulling the United States out of the pact.

Indeed, strong leadership on climate change is not new for city leaders. Reducing emissions and improving resilience are common concerns that are creating transnational networks of urban planners, policymakers and concerned citizens, including the C40, Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy and ...

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Jürgen Schmidt
last month
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Over the last decade or so, you may have heard a lot about the many different applications of solar street lights.

When you think about it, the locations fit for solar street lights are not as limited as many would suggest. People perceive limitations in solar street light applications caused by weather conditions (lack of sun) and shading. However, the introduction of smart technology and the sheer amount of under performing outdoor lighting units together with remote areas without lights increase the potential for installation of new solar street lights or solar retrofitting.

With the ongoing smartification of cities by applying new energy efficient technologies, implementation of green urban design projects and increasing demand for energy savings you can always find a diverse range of potential applications for solar powered street lights (such as public parking lots, parks, sidewalks, squares, city districts, roads, bicycle lanes and many other).

As with any renewable energy product that comes onto the scene, customers are chiming in with, "Will it function longer and better than other street lights? How to achieve ROI and energy savings in the shortest period possible?"

The short answer is: "Absolutely". The longer answer? Read on to find out what are some of the main urban applications of smart solar street lights.

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