Last stories on 'Energy and water'
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LABCITIES
6 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

On an electricity grid, electrons generated from the sun, wind, or other renewable sources are indistinguishable from those generated by fossil fuels. To keep track of how much clean energy is produced, governments around the world have created systems based on tradable certificates.

Problem is, the way we manage these certificates “sucks,” and it’s holding up investment in renewable power, says Jesse Morris, an energy expert at the Rocky Mountain Institute. A new system based on blockchain, the technology at the heart of Bitcoin and other digital currencies, could fix this, he says.

Keeping track of renewable-energy certificates is one of dozens of potential applications of blockchain technology that could solve data management challenges in the electricity sector without disrupting business as usual, according to Morris. He and many others believe that in the long term, the technology could help transform the very architecture of the grid itself.

A blockchain is a shared, encrypted ledger that is maintained by a network of computers. These computers verify transactions—in the case of Bitcoin, the transfer of cryptocurrency between individual users. Each user can access the ledger, and there is no single authority. Advocates say the technology could be especially promising in industries where networks of peers—electricity producers and consumers, connected via the grid, for instance—depend on shared sets of data.

LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

This is what the street of the future looks like.

So says a prediction from the Smart Cities Council, a government supported group mapping out the future of urban development in Australia.

The visualisation shows sci-fi-style technology like flying cars, stackable bicycle stands and Blade Runner-inspired holographic projections.

The Smart Cities display at Sydney's Circular Quay depicts a future using technology that already exists – self-driving public transport, electric cars and interactive games as play equipment.

LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Many US citizens and government officials are excited about the prospect of smart cities, but they also have concerns about issues such as paying for these initiatives, ensuring cybersecurity and privacy, and addressing a lack of needed technology skills.

That's according to a new study from technology industry association CompTIA, which surveyed 1,000 US households and 350 government officials on their awareness and interest in the concept of smart communities.

The report, "Building Smarter Cities and Communities," said six in 10 citizens would be interested in living in a smart city, although only 26 percent said they are familiar with the smart city concept. Sixty percent would support a ballot initiative involving smart city initiatives in their community.

Improved public Wi-Fi and broadband connectivity; monitoring of air quality; better water resource management; energy efficiency; and disaster monitoring and response are among the smart city use cases citizens are most interested in, according to the study.

Darshan Kalsariya
3 weeks ago
Darshan Kalsariya
Smart City Expert

With IoT applications in manufacturing sector, manufacturers can monitor the condition of machinery and look for indicators predictive failure, for example – vibration, temperature or pressure outside threshold limits. This means that the technician needs to make fewer visits, reducing costs and resulting in faster recovery.

IIoT brings radical changes in the manufacturing process and can make the entire process flow and people more informed, efficient and productive. Smart manufacturing builds an environment where all information is available from within plant floor to supply chain.

Connecting Production line Systems:

By Connecting production line systems, manufacturers can move to predictive maintenance, making better use of resources and reducing unplanned downtime. It can improve equipment utilization and plant output overall. Manufacturers can also track pallets, shipping containers and equipment, both on and off site using location aware IoT devices. Using a mix of con...

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LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

As Houston, Miami, Mumbai and other communities clean up following Hurricanes Harvey and Irma and unusually relentless monsoons, a new report offers strategies for bolstering urban defences against climate change.

“Cities100: A guide to cities preparing for the next Harvey and Irma” profiles the authors’ choices for the “100 best urban solutions to climate change around the world.”

The publication and accompanying online database were released this week as new storms continued to devastate islands in the Caribbean. Meanwhile, power outages plague more than a million residents of Florida and Georgia a week after a ferocious hurricane devastated the U. S. southeast.

Blunt predictions of worsening weather patterns are a motivation for cities to take preparatory steps now.

The international think tank Sustainia collaborated on the new project for the third year in a row with C40, the megacities network focused on climate change, and Realdania, a Copenhagen-based philanthropy that supports the built environment.

The 2017 version highlights 100 innovative ideas from 73 cities in 29 countries. The report focuses on solutions in five areas: transportation, waste, energy, mitigation and adaptation.

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