Last stories on 'Security and public safety'
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James Bell
3 days ago
James Bell
Smart City Expert

Traffic congestion has become a common problem since the time automobiles have hit the roads and overpopulation has hit the cities. The worse conditions are seen in developing countries where people adjust their daily routine according to the long hours they have to spend stuck in traffic. For the same reason urban planners have begun incorporating technology and artificial intelligence in reducing traffic congestions and in setting up a smart traffic management system.

Julian Sandler
last week
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

We’re in the midst of an exciting revolution that’s changing virtually everything about the way we work and live in cities. What’s happening to us all has various names—the Gartner Group calls it “the Nexus of Forces”; IDC Research refers to as “the Third Platform”. Others refer to it as “the Internet of Things (IoT) revolution”. Whatever name you choose, this could be the mother of all big transitions, and what’s driving it is the stitching together of a wide range of many different kinds of technology-driven disruptions.

One thing is clear, and it’s starting to get widely noticed: this process, stimulated by the emergence of low-cost connected technologies, is transforming our experience of cities as we’ve known them.

At its essence, IoT is the networked connection of people, process, data, and things. IoT brings together each of those elements – the people, the business processes, the data, and the things — to make networked connections more relevant and valuable. It turns inf...

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Jose Suarez
last week
Jose Suarez
Smart City Expert

Cities around the world are working hard to ensure that today’s high accident rates become a thing of the past. With the internet of things, smart mobility technology and smart infrastructure options abounding, the consensus is that a future of zero-fatality, accident-free roads is not only possible, but within our grasp. However, the approach cities are taking to the problem of driver safety may still be too reactive to create the change they’re hoping for.

One key part of these vision zero initiatives is the use of crowdsourced traffic data from mobile phones to identify high-risk intersections and areas where a disproportionate number of accidents and slowdowns occur. This is a major step forward from today’s system, in which risky areas are identified based on emergency response data and police reports (when they’re filed).

However, the idea of reactively responding after accidents have occurred is still decidedly low-tech, no matter how the data is being gathered. Cities change and grow continually, so the safety of the city will be constantly in flux as potential new hazard zones are introduced and retroactively identified. To truly be effective in creating a zero-fatality future, cities need the ability to proactively identify areas where accidents are likely to occur, so they can prevent accidents before they happen by adjusting speed limits, posting warning signage, or even rethinking and reconstructing the infrastructure in certain locations.

Julian Sandler
2 weeks ago
Julian Sandler
Smart City Expert

More than 250 smart city projects have launched in 178 cities around the world, according to a 2017 report from Navigant Research. The initiatives could have a range of benefits, from easing traffic congestion and parking woes to improving waste management and optimizing energy consumption.

Improved sensor technology and decreased costs make smart city technologies more efficient, better performing and less expensive than prior generations.

The market for energy-efficient building technologies alone may reach more than $360 billion in 2026, up from $227.4 billion this year, according to Navigant.

But smart technology also brings risks. Technicians must configure devices and systems properly to strengthen security. Hackers can easily exploit devices that contain open ports or factory-designed backdoors, for example.

Despite those and other challenges, the smart movement continues, ensuring that the cities of tomorrow will look very different from our urban settings today.

LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The increase in IoT-enabled devices and interconnectivity between various building management systems (BMS) prompts larger questions about cybersecurity and data privacy concerns. These challenges are hardly new, but they are magnified in an IoT-connected world.

Industry forecasts expect the IoT market will grow from an installed base of 15.4 billion devices in 2015 to 30.7 billion devices in 2020 and 75.4 billion in 2025. Many of these devices will be deployed in buildings, public works and critical infrastructure. Smart technologies will establish an urban landscape that is all-connected, all-sharing, all-knowing and imbued with a functionality that can provide unprecedented levels of comfort and convenience.

The convergence of smart technologies and the built environment will improve the operation and capabilities of buildings, but will also lead to increased vulnerabilities and attack vectors not previously encountered within design engineering and urban planning.

Research...

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