Last stories on 'Security and public safety'
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LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The day when cars can talk to each other – and to traffic lights, stop signs, guardrails and even pavement markings – is rapidly approaching. Driven by the promise of reducing traffic congestion and avoiding crashes, these systems are already rolling out on roads around the U.S.

For instance, the Intelligent Traffic Signal System, developed with support from the U.S. Department of Transportation, has been tested on public roads in Arizona and California and is being installed more widely in New York City and Tampa, Florida. It allows vehicles to share their real-time location and speed with traffic lights, which can be used to effectively optimize the traffic timing in coordination with the real-time traffic demand to dramatically reduce vehicle waiting time in an intersection.

Our work, from the RobustNet Research Group and the Michigan Traffic Laboratory at the University of Michigan, focuses on making sure these next-generation transportation systems are secure and protected from attacks. So far we’ve found they are in fact relatively easy to trick. Just one car that’s transmitting fake data can cause enormous traffic jams, and several attack cars could work together to shut down whole areas. What’s particularly concerning is that our research has found the weakness is not in the underlying communication technology, but in the algorithms actually used to manage the traffic flow.

Jose Suarez
last month
Jose Suarez
Smart City Expert

A smart city can be described as a city that incorporates the capabilities of web connectivity, analytics, mobile solutions, sensors, data collection and other technology. This can include surveillance systems utilized by law enforcement, smart congestion-mitigating traffic systems, LED streetlights equipped with motion sensors, smart grids and smart water systems.

A smart city contains a myriad of objects that receive, collect and transmit data.

The purpose of smart city data collection is to enable the creation of innovative new products and services that improve the quality of life in a given smart city. Smart cities have the potential to solve a variety of municipal issues. But, as is the case with technology in general, these cities are also vulnerable to serious threats.

Judit Urquijo
last month
Judit Urquijo
Content curator

The protection against cyberattacks on critical infrastructures is vital to ensure the normal fuctioning of any city. This is why NIST has updated its Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, provinding organisations with a tool that can determine activities that are most important to critical service delivery and prioritize expenditures to maximize the impact of the investment

Jürgen Schmidt
2 months ago
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

Modern cities are brimming with objects that receive, collect and transmit data. This includes mobile phones but also objects actually embedded into our cities, such as traffic lights and air pollution stations. Even something as simple as a garbage bin can now be connected to the internet, meaning that it forms part of what is called the internet of things (IoT). A smart city collects the data from these digital objects, and uses it to create new products and services that make cities more liveable.

Although they have huge potential to make life better, the possibility of increasingly smarter cities also raises serious privacy concerns. Through sensors embedded into our cities, and the smartphones in our pockets, smart cities will have the power to constantly identify where people are, who they are meeting and even perhaps what they are doing.

Following revelations that 87m people’s Facebook data was allegedly breached and used to influence electoral voting behaviour, it is ever more important to properly scrutinise where our data goes and how it is used. Similarly, as more and more critical infrastructure falls victim to cyber-attacks, we need to consider that our cities are not only becoming smarter, they are also becoming more vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

Marcelo Misael
3 months ago
Marcelo Misael
Business Development Director at Citymatica

Dear collegues,

I would like to share this opportunity to become a business partner of Citymatica.com at your city.
I am looking for experienced professionals with interest of becoming partners and local representatives inside its region.

We are looking for representatives in Latin America , Africa and Spain, USA and Canada.

If you are interested in working with us, send me email: marcelo.misael@citymatica.com.

Warm regards,

Marcelo Misael
Business Development Director
Citymatica

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