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Bart Gorynski
6 days ago
Bart Gorynski
Smartivist | @bee smart city

Hamilton’s focus on equal access to digital resources and education will ensure that its citizens can all play their part in the future of this smart city.

At the western end of Canada’s Lake Ontario nestles a city of almost 540,000 culturally diverse people. Once handling 60% of Canada’s steel production and earning the title ‘the Steel Capital of Canada’, its steel operations are now waning and the industrial city of Hamilton is looking for a new foundation for the future of its inhabitants.

That new foundation is to be both figurative and literal: the city has so far provided financial incentives to the tune of over C$20 million for companies to remediate and repurpose Hamilton’s polluted former industrial sites, the re-development of which – aside from improving the environmental health of the city – has poured money into the construction industry and is already responsible for the creation of at least 650 new jobs.

Hamilton knows that the future of its economy lies in the development of new industries and businesses, especially in such areas as digital communications, healthcare and life sciences and it is doing its best to attract them. Aside from the ERASE remediation project helping to secure more clean and usable land, Hamilton is working on getting broadband access all around the city. read more...

Jason Black
17 hours ago
Jason Black
Project Manager

Modern cities are brimming with objects that receive, collect and transmit data. This includes mobile phones but also objects actually embedded into our cities, such as traffic lights and air pollution stations. Even something as simple as a garbage bin can now be connected to the internet, meaning that it forms part of what is called the internet of things (IoT). A smart city collects the data from these digital objects, and uses it to create new products and services that make cities more liveable.

Although they have huge potential to make life better, the possibility of increasingly smarter cities also raises serious privacy concerns. Through sensors embedded into our cities, and the smartphones in our pockets, smart cities will have the power to constantly identify where people are, who they are meeting and even perhaps what they are doing.

Following revelations that 87 million people’s Facebook data was allegedly breached and used to influence electoral voting behaviour, it is ever more important to properly scrutinise where our data goes and how it is used. Similarly, as more and more critical infrastructure falls victim to cyberattacks, we need to consider that our cities are not only becoming smarter, they are also becoming more vulnerable to cyberattacks.

LABCITIES
3 days ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Global urbanization is seemingly unstoppable, and with more and more citizens, the cost of living in cities is skyrocketing, threatening to increase social inequality, slow down economic growth and push up crime levels. Smart cities are said to provide the solution to this problem by implementing technology into city projects to help reduce costs.

Technology has therefore brought city infrastructure to the forefront of our agendas – and increasingly citizens are embracing smart homes, and local and national governments are promoting smart technology initiatives, from smart street lighting to driverless public transport. There’s no denying it, smart cities are no longer a thing of the future. They’re very much here.

But becoming a smart city is more than simply reveling in technology advancements. According to a recent study conducted by ABI Research, in partnership with InterDigital, on behalf of its Smart Cities-focused business, ChordantTM, and CA Technologies, the scope for ef...

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Judit Urquijo
6 days ago
Judit Urquijo
Content curator

The agreement between Streamr, the blockchain-backed data platform, and Hewlett Packard Enterprise opens the door to the huge potential market for data sales. What future effect can it have on the economy? Will it help to build greater confidence in the people by rewarding them?

LABCITIES
last week
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

What is a smart city? The answer depends on who you ask. Solutions providers will tell you it’s smart parking, smart lighting or anything to do with technology. City officials may tell you it’s about conducting city business online, such as searching records or applying for permits. City residents may tell you it’s the ease of getting around, or about crime reduction. Everyone is right.

A smart city, built properly, will provide different value to different stakeholders. They may not think of their city as a “smart”city. They know it only as a place they want to live in, work in, and be a part of. To build this type of city, you have to first build the smart city ecosystem.

Bart Gorynski
2 days ago
Bart Gorynski
Smartivist | @bee smart city

Smart city initiatives need to not only be people-centric, but actually co-created by everyone in the community, if they are to be inclusive.

Many proponents of the smart city claim that it is by nature inclusive. However, like all other aspects of urban design and development, smart city initiatives frequently fail to fully prioritize inclusivity, often perpetuating the very issues that they aim to solve. As Gil Peñalosa, world-renowned urban designer, noted in a recent panel discussion on ‘The Invisible Smart City’: “we currently design our cities as though everyone is 30 and active”, leading to biased, inaccessible urban design that excludes what he calls the ‘silent majority’. Going one step further than this, Yves Raibaud, acclaimed sociologist and urban geographer, argues that cities are designed ‘by and for men’ (par et pour les hommes) - notably ‘western’, privileged men. This evidently leaves much to be desired in terms of diversity, and in turn inclusivity. Children, older...

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Jose Suarez
6 days ago
Jose Suarez
Smart City Expert

A smart city can be described as a city that incorporates the capabilities of web connectivity, analytics, mobile solutions, sensors, data collection and other technology. This can include surveillance systems utilized by law enforcement, smart congestion-mitigating traffic systems, LED streetlights equipped with motion sensors, smart grids and smart water systems.

A smart city contains a myriad of objects that receive, collect and transmit data.

The purpose of smart city data collection is to enable the creation of innovative new products and services that improve the quality of life in a given smart city. Smart cities have the potential to solve a variety of municipal issues. But, as is the case with technology in general, these cities are also vulnerable to serious threats.

Marc Van Steyvoort
5 days ago
Marc Van Steyvoort
Co-Founder at LABCITIES

A time ago i could find info on Pavement Scanner that has been specifically developed for Road Condition Assessment completely, independent from limitations regarding the speed of the mobile survey platform while offering utmost measuring accuracy in the sub-mm range :The 3D Pavement Surface LiDAR System

I wonder where this service positions in added value , where it positions in price compared to actual solutions, where the service is used already and who Haptic sees as the end customer for such a product.

Jürgen Schmidt
last week
Jürgen Schmidt
Smart Consultant

It’s 2043. Few people in cities own cars anymore. It’s cheaper to rely on electric, self-driving taxis. Some vehicles are big enough to share; others are individually sized to make the most of limited street space. They have one button inside: Stop. Dynamic curbs — patrolled by enforcement droids — remain clear for deliveries, pick-ups, and drop-offs. Street parking no longer exists, and this space has been recaptured for better public uses.

That’s the future as seen by David Levinson, the University of Sydney transport professor who writes the popular Transportist blog and is co-author of the 2017 book The End of Traffic and the Future of Access. “Look back to the 1920s, and you have magazines that ask: What does the future look like?” he says. “Some of it is absurd. Why would we all be using blimps? But some of it’s still like: Why doesn’t the future look like that?”

The truth, he says, is that imagining tomorrow’s urban mobility raises far more questions than it answers. If we get used to the idea of using taxis, what other things will we no longer feel the need to own? What are the new things we now can do because robots can move around without supervision? What will we do with all the extra time we don’t have to spend driving? How do you allocate road space in a world with delivery drones?

LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The world is rapidly urbanizing. The United Nations predicts that the number of people living in cities could double by 2050 — to 6.5 billion.

To accommodate growing populations, cities like Paris, New York, and Tokyo are building more housing and public resources, including parks, schools, and subways, as part of large redevelopment plans.

These cities will likely look very different (and in some neighborhoods, gentrified) in the coming decades. Take a look at some of the biggest urban projects under construction below.

LABCITIES
2 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Is Smart City really the solution oWorldwide, cities are responsible for two thirds of energy consumption and 70 to 80% of greenhouse gas emissions. We also know that in the coming decades, 95% of population growth will take place in urban areas, due to a rural exodus caused by the excessive poverty of farmers who can no longer compete on their own land. However, according to Hammer et al (2011)[1], the lower the urban density, the higher the energy consumption for electricity and transport, which is proven by the fact that per capita CO2 emissions fall with increasing urban density.

Does this mean that urbanization and urban densification are solutions to energy and climate challenges? Is it the same issue for the countries of the North and the South? How will we feed the cities if the countryside is empty? How can agriculture and its production methods be associated with these challenges?f tomorrow?

Judit Urquijo
2 weeks ago
Judit Urquijo
Content curator

The protection against cyberattacks on critical infrastructures is vital to ensure the normal fuctioning of any city. This is why NIST has updated its Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, provinding organisations with a tool that can determine activities that are most important to critical service delivery and prioritize expenditures to maximize the impact of the investment

Jean-Paul Rouge
2 weeks ago
Jean-Paul Rouge
Independent professional

There isn’t one distinct thing a building can change to become “smart.” Each building and its occupants are unique and require a unique approach. However, many times occupants and owners can feel the difference intuitively when working in a smart building.

The benefit of having a smart building is hard to value, and sometimes the best way to understand that value is to make the leap and implement low-capital cost, non-invasive projects that provide small yet potent improvements. Gathering these quick wins can help sell and lead into bigger endeavors. I’ll list my top 5 IoT projects to give your building a higher education.

LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Ask average citizens about their biggest frustrations in dealing with government organizations and you’re likely to conjure up at least a few stories of never-ending lines at the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). Bureaucracy and manual processes have, fairly or not, become synonymous with the business of government. They upset constituents, and chances are they don’t help government workers get their jobs done, either.

But the advent of new technologies promises to simplify work for state and local employees. Powered by artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, these emerging capabilities have tremendous potential for a smarter and more agile government and public sector as a whole.

Examples of this already exist. Chatbots on agency websites now answer increasingly complex questions and execute customer assistance tasks that previously drained employee resources and hours. It’s meant fewer calls to government agencies and more valuable staff hours available for other tasks.

LABCITIES
last month
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

Information Age spoke to Stephen Brobst, CTO of Teradata, and former appointee to Barack Obama’s United States President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, about Teradata’s focus on emerging smart city technologies, and it’s partnership with Cisco.

The partnership leverages the latest IoT and analytics technologies of both companies to solve a big problem with smart cities – finally moving from simply connecting cities to using predictive and prescriptive analytics decision-making for a variety of urban services.

Together, the companies will unlock IoT value for smart cities to: Gather, aggregate and normalise information from siloed city applications; pave the way for a future of smart cities affecting everything from lighting, parking, traffic and waste management, citizen engagement, safety and security; and develop a new and comprehensive ecosystem to empower city managers, who are expected to invest $80 billion in smart cities this year, to make better, data-driven decisions.

LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

A recent study from the European Data Portal examined the level of ‘open data maturity’ across the EU and Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, who are referred to as the EU28+.

The paper reveals that the 31 countries collectively made significant progress between 2015-2016, with an average progression of 28.6% over the year. Whilst this means that most countries have a basic level of open data by now, the report still highlights significant discrepancies between countries.

LABCITIES
3 weeks ago
LABCITIES
By Joan Torres

The Finnish lift’s walls are bathed by a blue luminescence; music that is not quite jazz gently tootles within. The effect is comforting. But other things are odd. The lift’s dozen or so buttons seem numbered at random and, one would think, unfeasibly: 45, 105, 215, 270. At level 350 the doors hiss open on a dark and dirty cavern, silent save for the sound of dripping water.

Germany’s highest meeting room, 1,000km (600 miles) to the south-west of that strange Finnish lift, has its oddities, too. It looks out not at a central business district, but on the bucolic edge of the Black Forest. It sits atop a skyscraper which contains no offices but 12 lift shafts. In the lift by which you reach the penthouse an indicator tells you not just what floor you are headed for, but how fast you are getting there.

Thyssenkrupp, a German engineering conglomerate, and Kone, a Finnish liftmaker, are two of the world’s big four lift-engineering companies. As such, they need places to test new desig...

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